Being Introverted- What Does It REALLY Mean?

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about this seemingly small word. Introvert.

introverts assemble

Sinfest / sinfest.net

Whether you are an introvert or an extrovert, it affects every part of your life, not to mention your mental health when each type’s core need is not met.

For introverts this need means a lot of alone time, for extroverts social interaction. And I think that since what you are “supposed” to be in order to be successful and popular in today’s society is social and active- introverts can sometimes have  a hard time. Even more so since the true meaning of introversion isn’t common knowledge, leaving many to feel like there is something wrong with them.

I’m hoping to spread a bit of light on the subject so that we can all understand each other a bit better and become more accepting of who we are. 🙂

What Being Introverted DOESN’T Mean

Let’s start by clearing up some misconceptions. Contrary to common belief, being introverted does not have to mean that you:

  • are painfully shy
  • never speak up in public
  • do not like people

An introvert CAN of course have these traits, but it is not what makes them introverted.

What It DOES Mean

Being introverted mean that you gain your energy from yourself, from being on your own. You need space and alone time to recharge your batteries, while an extrovert will become energized by their surroundings and by being around other people.

I could never say it better than this infographic by Roman Jones:

Dr Carmella's Guide to Understanding the Introverted
Dr. Carmella’s Guide ❤

Think you might be an introvert?

I’d say the amount of times you giggle at and identify with these graphs from Buzzfeed could be a decently accurate and quick (or at least amusing) way to measure your level of introversion. 😛

graph 1 -introvertgraph 2 -introvertgraph 3 - introversiongraph 4 - introversiongraph 5 - introversiongraph 6 - introversiongraph 7 - introversiongraph 8 - introversiongraph 9 - introversiongraph 10 - introversiongraph 11 - introversiongraph 12 - introversiongraph 13 - introversiongraph 14 - introversiongraph 15 - introversiongraph 16 - introversiongraph 17 - introversion

Final words

Of course people aren’t binary. Most have a mix of introvert and extrovert traits and nothing says an introvert can’t be the life of the party or that an extrovert can’t be uncomfortable around people.
The one thing that really differs is how you stay on top of the madness that is life. And if that is going into hermit-mode whenever you get the chance, escaping into your favourite book for the 17th time, then that’s cool.

You are not boring, weird or alone.

(Or maybe we both are but you know what? It’s awesome. Embrace it.)

gemma corell introvert

Gemma Correll / gemmacorrell.com

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Top 3 Creepy-Crawly Reads

Long dark days were made for creepy books. Just be sure to turn the lights on before you start reading, I actually feel a bit tense after just writing the reviews below. Good going Johanna.

Starting from third place:

3. “Bird Box” by Josh Malerman

bird box

Something bad is happening. At first, there is just the occasional story in the news or on the radio about weird things happening to strangers very far away. The kind of stories that are easy to shake from your mind. Then, whatever is happening comes closer. People seem to be going… mad, in lack of better words. Family members, lovers and passerbyes violently turn on each other, all over the world.

The one thing all the horrific attacks have in common is that before they happened, the attacker saw something. The stories have suddenly become very real and soon survivors have to deal the only way they can: through holing up inside barricaded houses or hiding spots and never looking out.

“In a world where you can’t open your eyes, isn’t a blindfold all you could ever hope for?”

Composed of flashbacks from the past and snippets from the present that gradually meet to reveal the full story, Birdbox is an elegant but straight-forward read. Regardless of what the cover says, the story is a bit cliché, but I am really fascinated by this kind of unseen, waiting horror– the complete helplessness that comes from it.
I always found it scarier to not know exactly what you are dealing with, and this is just the kind of subtle, survival-focused horror tale I delight in. Even if I’ll need to have the lights turned on for a week after.

2. “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children”
by Ransom Riggs

Miss Peregrines home for peculiar children

This is such a cool book! Mixing narrative with haunting vintage photography, this is a strange and spine-tingling read.
One thing I enjoyed is that despite the creepy photos and the dark plot, which I’ll get to in a moment, Jacob is very much an average teenager. His character is thoughtful yet easy-going which creates a good balance between the impossible and everyday life.

We hadn’t spoken since the day he nearly shoved me off the roof, but we both understood the importance of maintaining the illusion of having friends.

I don’t want to say too much about the plot for fear of ruining the suspense for you. But this is the gist of it:
After a tragedy strikes his family, sixteen-year-old Jacob is on the hunt for the truth of things. And something is on the hunt for him. He journeys to Wales where he discovers the ruins of “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children” and finds his answers, but also many more mysteries.

I have not yet read the sequels but I have heard that they are really good as well, so that’s nice (as Shirley from Community would say). ❤

1. “White is for Witching” by Helen Oyeyemi

white-is-for-witching

A dream of a tale– confusing and sharp, beautiful and foreboding. I wasn’t even sure I liked it at first, but I’ve never been able to forget it and the prose is exquisite.
I think this is the kind of book that you either love or hate. If you are interested in books about mental illness and philosophy plus have a taste for the gothic and intellectual– I definitely suggest you give it a go. However, it is not for people who enjoy a story told from the beginning straight to the end and appreciates clarity and order.

I know of witches who whistle at different pitches, calling things that don’t have names.

White is for Witching tells of a haunted house, and of the Silver family who has inhabited it for centuries. Of loss, sorrow, lust, bonds and broken minds. Mostly, it tells of the young Miranda Silver who has gone missing, and her twin brother Eliot who is searching for her.

That was it for today, let me know if you’ve already read any of them or if you would like to! What are you favourite creepy books?

/Joh

Geek Approved – October

October has now passed and time just continues, barreling down the hallway of life like a crazed quarterback. Seriously. I can’t keep up.
r2-d2-falls-over
Me dealing with life.
A lot of cool things happened between exams and curling up in fetal position from lack of life-handling-skills.
These were my nerdy favourites for the past month:

1. Roleplaying

svavelvinter bok rollspel roleplaying book

As I wrote in (Tabletop Roleplaying – My First Time) I have kinda feared the actual roleplaying. Then I was sidetracked with some lovely character creation and forgot to be nervous. But yesterday, the time had finally come.
I would have to actually… act. Or at least pretend in front of people and not just in my head.

But it was amazing. Yes, my face was kind of red. Yes, I had to have a drink or two for bravery. But it was SO MUCH FUN. I love exploring new worlds, through gaming or books and I will now add roleplaying to that list.

The best moment of the night was when my character had to desperately defend herself. At the crucial dice roll which would decide if she would succeed in defending herself with wind magic, or likely die, I scored sixes. Which meant the assassin was literally blasted across the alley by a gust of wind so powerful it took everything in its way with it.
I felt like goddamn Kvothe when he called the wind for the first time.

excited minions

It was, just to cement your view of me as a sad little nerd, everything I’ve ever dreamt of. Can I always be her instead of me? Okay, maybe that’s not a healthy approach. My point is, it felt like being there. The only equally strong sense of stepping into another world and affecting it myself, not just spectating, was when I first played World of Warcraft, many years ago. And that is saying something.

To all others who are afraid of trying out tabletop roleplaying, who thinks it is too nerdy and that they will feel embarrassed playing pretend like that:
With the right friends and someone to guide you through it, it can be an absolutely amazing experience.

2. Guild Wars 2

guild wars 2
I never fell for GW2 like I though I would. It was a very pretty game and I loved customizing my character (so much I made four in a row before even pressing play).
But the story didn’t grab me and I felt that I had no direction or purpose. Sandbox games are not always my cup of tea.

Now though
, on the third attempt, there’s a spark.I’m getting the hang of my abilities and the game mechanics- I’m thoroughly enjoying discovering events and hunting down bosses. I’ve not gotten excited about a “new” MMO in a long while. So yay!
dr horrible fingers crossed

3. Halloween

Halloween is always a highlight for me. But this year things got quite stressful. Eventually it worked out though and I had a brilliant night with my BF and friends.
Here is my costume! (Or you know, the parts of it that fit in a bathroom selfie.)

fawn_halloween
I was some kind of Urban Fawn-Demon/Forest Creature. Just go with it. xD

I got lots of compliments on my horns which of course made me go  ~*w*~ (=starry-eyed, overly excited and waving my arms around like a jellyfish, in case that wasn’t clear.)

If you want to make your own for a cosplay or a party or something, you can  have a look at my antler-tutorial here. Quick and cheap, the way I like it. (Y)

What did you enjoy most in October– a book, a movie or dressing up as something awesome for Halloween?

/Joh